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Greenhouse Gases International Agreements

Greenhouse Gases International Agreements

The ultimate goal of the UNFCCC is to “stabilize greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would stop dangerous anthropogenic interventions in the climate system.” [25] Even if the Schedule I contracting parties meet their first-round commitments, much greater emission reductions will be needed in the future to stabilize ThG concentrations in the atmosphere. [24] [26] An important indicator of progress in stabilizing emissions is the level of increase in emissions from each country from year to year – their incremental emissions. It is clear that the greatest impact on climate stabilization will be that the largest incremental emitters stabilize their emissions. But the more we go into the decade of the 1990s without stabilization, the more difficult it will be to achieve the internationally recognized voluntary goal (The World Bank, 1995). The World Bank calculated incremental emissions for 1986-91 by adapting a linear trend to CDIAC emissions data. Where the trend was insignificant, the increment was zeroed. This process has been repeated for both individual national data and total global emissions. The Kyoto Protocol is an international agreement to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and the presence of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere. The key principle of the Kyoto Protocol was that industrialized countries had to reduce the volume of their CO2 emissions. At the international level, UN member states created the most important international treaty on climate change in 1992: the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC or FCCC). The national emissions targets set by the Kyoto Protocol exclude international air and sea transport.

Parties to the Kyoto Protocol can use changes in agriculture, land use and forestry (UTCATF) to achieve their goals. [71] Utcatical activities are also called sink activities. Indeed, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change on Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry estimates that since 1750, one-third of global warming has been caused by land use changes. [73] Specific criteria apply to the definition of forestry under the Kyoto Protocol. The Kyoto Protocol called for industrialized countries to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions at a time when the threat of global warming was growing rapidly. The protocol was linked to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). On 16 February 2005, it was adopted in Kyoto (90) and entered international law on 16 February 2005. However, the Kyoto Protcol targets are being challenged by climate change deities, who condemn strong scientific evidence of the human impact on climate change.